Ecce Homo by St. Albert Chmielowski Rustic Wood Plaque

$35.00
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SKU:
RWP-4059
Ecce Homo by St. Albert Chmielowski Rustic Wood Plaque

Most of our products are custom made to order, and can take up to 10 days to ship. If an item is needed sooner, please call 740-481-0449 to make arrangements.

 

This rustic wood plaque featuring Ecce Homo by St. Albert Chmielowski comes from trees grown and harvested in Ohio and is 100% made in the U.S.A. Each solid wood plaque is hewn and joined together by the hands of our Steubenville woodworkers then digitally printed with hi-tech inks that slowly stain and permeate the wood with a scratch-free work of art.

Because these rustic plaques are made from real, solid wood, each piece may have minor cracks, knots, and other imperfections that add character and authenticity. As unique as human fingerprints, no two plaques are alike.

Smaller sizes of plaques are cut from single boards, while larger sizes are made up of several boards joined together.

A familiar subject undertaken by many artists, Ecce Homo by Polish artist Albert Chmielowski depicts the moment Christ was presented by Pontius Pilate to the crowd that had gathered to watch as Our Lord was scourged, crowned with thorns, and mocked by Roman soldiers.

St. Albert Chmielowski, canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1989 , was a well-known painter in his day before leaving the trade in order to more fully live out his calling to serve the poor as a professed Third Order Franciscan. He founded two religious orders, the Servants of the Poor and the Sisters Serving the Poor, commonly known as the Albertine Brothers and Albertine Sisters.

Pope John Paul II was greatly influenced and inspired by the example of St. Albert during own formation as a young Polish priest. John Paul II even wrote a play about St. Albert's life entitled "Our God's Brother," which was later made into a feature length film in 1997.

In the image, a beaten Jesus Christ stands with a rod, crown of thorns, and a cloak while waiting for his death.

 

( RWP-4059 )